Competition

“Your test is not the test,” the teacher said once the time was up and pencils were down. His face was smug as he saw all the students expressions. Some were equally as smug. Some were confused, others were visibly upset. He listened to their complaints for a minute, before holding up his hand. “No, everyone. That doesn’t mean the test was not a waste of time. What matters is not what you produce, but how you present it.”

“So what does that supposed to mean?” asked the bratty student in the third row.

“It means, you have the remaining 20 minutes of class to present your essays to me,” the teacher informed them.

“There’s not enough time to do that!” another complained from the back.

“It doesn’t need to take long,” the teacher smirked. “Just get them on my desk, without leaving your seats, in the next 19 minutes, and you’ll find there are different ways of acing a test than just knowing every answer.” He pursed his lips, sat back and waited for the class to take action. “18 minutes.”

The students began to scramble, each row trying to come up with a different solution. The first row of those he knew were suck ups began yelling for his attention, reading off their essays as rapidly but comprehensively as they could. Others were frantically racking their brains for the best paper plane models they could think of. Some of the jocks sitting to the side looked dumbfoundedly at their papers, unsure of what to do. Their paper was crap, surely the presentation would be crap too.

But one student lounged in his seat in the middle of the crowd, at least until the minute marker had arrived. He had been in eye contact with the teacher the whole time. As minutes became seconds, he crumpled his paper up into a ball and threw it towards the teacher. The teacher caught it, nodded to the student, and allowed the kid to leave before the bell rang.

The other students looked at each other, dumbfounded and embarrassed at themselves for not thinking of it sooner. The teacher, however, was looking over his essay, already knowing the kid was going places. ns-monogram1

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